Category Archives: education

17 tips for parenting with omnipresent mobile devices, YouTube and apps

Before I dove into the sometimes controversial waters of technology and development, I talked to a lot of people about parenting and screen time, including some experts. I wrote about what I learned in a column about the parenting challenges that ubiquitous screens pose in the 21st century.

Following is a quick list of insights to scan & share, with a big lift from danah boyd at the end.

1) Screens are ubiquitous in modern life. How we integrate them into our own lives will influence our children.

2) Engagement with our children as we consume media, whether on TV, tablets, or print, is critical to their learning.

3) “Parents can’t go wrong if they engage in “dialogic learning.” As you read or watch screens, talk about the stories.

4) There’s an important difference between children passively consuming media on a screen andusing it to be social. Watching a video isn’t the same as Facetiming with grandparents.

5) Parents should consider if screen time consuming media may be replacing human-to-human interaction.

6) Kids generally learn better with materials they can touch, vs what they see on a screen. 3D > 2D.

7) Not all screen time is detrimental. It should be age appropriate, time-limited, & involve parents.

8) Children learning through play are negatively impacted by screens playing in the background.

9) Watching TV or videos 2 hours before bedtime can have negative impacts on children’s sleep.

10) Common sense: use of mobile devices by parents, ignoring children, can lead to them acting out.

11) Too much interactivity in ebooks and games can actually distract from story lines and learning.

12) From danah boyd: “Parents: check your own screen engagement when you’re with your kid. We set the norms.

13) “When you’ve got younger kids, talk through every interaction you have with a screen” — danah boyd

14) “When your kids are older, talk them through how they want to allocate their time in general” — danah boyd

15) “It’s not about ‘screen vs. non-screen’ because homework is now screen. It’s about thinking about what time should look like.” — danah boyd

16) “What makes screen time ‘educational’ is…how the tech or media is integrated into life more generally”- — danah boyd

17) “Forgive yourself for using tech as a babysitter sometimes.”— danah boyd. Have empathy for other parents, too, especially on plane rides or long bus rides.

Fellow parents, your comments and thoughts on screen time, kids and learning are welcome.

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under article, education, journalism, research

Classrooms and community: my moderation standards for Google+, Facebook and blog comments

Over the past few months, I’ve seen a lot of spam and pornography links on Google Plus, on Facebook and on the blogs I maintain. Fortunately, blogs, Google and Facebook both give us the ability to moderate comments and, if we wish, to block other people who do not respect the opinions or character of others.

Last night, I’m seeing a lack of clarity about my approach to online community, so here’s how I think about it, with a nod to the example set by Arizona State University journalism professor Dan Gillmor.

I can and do block spammers and people posting links to pornography.

I will leave comments on on my blogs, precisely because I value conversations, despite the issues that persist online. I have been moderating discussion in online forums and blogs for many years, including those of my publishers. My full thoughts on the value of blog comments — and the social norms that I expect people comments to live within — are on this blog. To date, there are 196 comments on the post.

Vilely insulting me won’t help your case. Insulting others will ruin it. I was a teacher in my twenties. I would not tolerate disrespectful behavior in my classroom, either to me or to other students. If you can’t be civil and continue to insult others, much less the person hosting the forum, you were asked to leave and see the principal.

If the behavior persists, you will lose the privilege of participating in “class.” Eventually, you get expelled. On Google+ or blogs, that takes the form of being defriended, banned or blocked from my public updates. I prefer not to block users but I will do it. I respect your right to speak freely on your own blog, Twitter, Facebook or Google+ account, whether that involves cursing or ignorance.

I strongly believe in the First Amendment. Governments should not censor citizens. That said, I do not, however, feel obligated to host such speech on my own blog, particularly if it is directed towards other commenters. I believe that building and maintaining healthy communities, online of offline, requires that the people hosting them enforce standards for participation that encourage civil dialogue.

I hope that makes sense to friends, readers and colleagues. If not, you are welcome to let me know in the comments.

3 Comments

Filed under blogging, education, social media, technology

Awesome Foundation DC Launch Party warmly welcomed in District

Over the past year, the Awesome Foundation has been growing globally, providing micro-grants for creative genius in multiple continents. Last night, hundreds of people bought “Tickets to Awesome” and joined the DC chapter of the Awesome Foundation at a launch party in One Lounge in Dupont Circle.

Party goers mixed and mingled with the DC chapter’s microtrustees, including this correspondent, and checked out exhibits and demonstrations from the first four recipients of awesome grants. DC FabLab, Ward 8, Petworth and Counterpoint were in attendance for awards ceremony. Bonnie Shaw (@Bon_Zai), DC’s “Dean of Awesome,” gave a brief speech at the launch party ceremony:

Curious folks also checked out exhibits from My Dream of Jeanne, ExAparatus and ScrapAction, donating to the projects they liked the most using the awesome tokens that came with their tickets. Counterpoint even performed upstairs in front of a packed lounge.

You can follow the Awesome Foundation DC on Twitter for updates on new grants, performances, installations and other awesome events at @AFdnDC.

2 Comments

Filed under art, article, education, friends, journalism, music, photography, social media, technology, video

Looking Back: The Best Interviews of 2010 [VIDEO]

2010 was full of amazing stories and experiences, both personal and professional. I’m grateful for the many opportunities I had speak to brilliant, fascinating people about technology, government, media and civil society. I’ve learned a tremendous amount from my interviews this year, many of which were captured on video. Some were filmed with my iPhone 4, others with a Canon 110si, others by O’Reilly Media’s professional video team after I joined the company as its new Gov 2.0 Washington Correspondent.

Regardless of the quality of light, image or sound, each interview taught me something new, and I’m proud they’re all available on the Web to the public. The list below isn’t exhaustive, either. There are easily a dozen other excellent interviews on my channel on YouTube, O’Reilly Media’s YouTube channel, uStream and Livestream. Thank you to each and every person who took time to talk to me this past year.

20. Professor Fred Cate on electronic privacy protections and email

19. Google Open Advocate Chris Messina on Internet freedom

18. Foursquare Creator Dennis Crowley on the NASA Tweetup and #IVoted

17. Co-Chairman of the Future of Privacy Forum Jules Polonetsky

16. NASA CTO Chris Kemp on cloud computing and open source

15. Portland Mayor Sam Adams on open data

14. Former Xerox Chief Scientist and PARC Director John Seely Brown on education

13. NPR’s Andy Carvin on CrisisWiki

12. ISE Founder Claire Lockhart on government accountability

11. Cisco CTO Padmasree Warrior on the evolution of smarter cities

10. Ushahidi Co-Founder Ory Okolloh on crowdsourcing

9. Senator Kate Lundy on Gov 2.0 in Australia

8. Intellipedia: Moving from a culture of “need to know” to “need to share” using wikis

7. ESRI Co-Founder Jack Dangermond on mapping

6. Sunlight Foundation Co-Founder Ellen Miller on Open Government

5. HHS CTO Todd Park on Open Health Data

4. FCC Tech Cast with Expert Lab’s Gina Trapani

3. Apple Co-founder Steve Wozniak on the Open Internet

2. United States CTO Aneesh Chopra on Open Government

1. Tim Berners-Lee on Open Linked Data

Leave a comment

Filed under cyberlaw, education, government 2.0, journalism, social media, technology, video

Using social media for better journalism: @Sreenet at #ONADC

“I used to say “justify every pixel,” said Sree Sreenivasan. “Now I say earn every reader.”

Sreenivasan, a dean of student affairs and professor at the Columbia Journalism School, went beyond “what Jeff Jarvis calls the blog boy dance,” offering up more than an hour of cogent advice, perspective and tips on social media to a packed classroom populated by members of the DC Online News Association at Georgetown’s campus in Virginia.

Where once he used to go around newsrooms to talk about email, then Google and blogs, now he’s moved to new tools of digital journalism grounded in a reciprocal relationship between the audience and the reporter. After all, Sreenivasan had to tailor his talk to the audience, a collection of writers, editors and producers already steeped in the tools of digital journalism, moving quickly beyond listing Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn to the tools and services that that enable journalists to use those social media platforms improve their reporting, editing and careers.

“The best people find the things that work for them and skip the rest,” said Sreenivasan. Services need to be useful, relevant and extend the journalist’s work. Quoting a student, now at the Wall Street Journal, Sreenivasan observed that you “can have greatest content in world but will die on the vine if we don’t have a way for our readers to find it.” He classified the utility of social media for journalists into four broad categories:

  • tracking trends on a given beat
  • connecting with the audience, where ever it is online
  • putting that audience to work, aka crowdsourcing
  • building and curating the journalists personal brand

“Tools should fit into workflow and life flow,” he said. “All journalists should be early testers and late adopters.” In that context, he shared three other social media tools he’s tried but does not use: Google Wave, Google Buzz and Foursquare. Sreenivaan also offered Second Life as as an example, quipped that “I have twins; I have no time for first life!”

The new Listener-in-Chief

One group that undoubtedly needs to keep up with new tools and platforms is the burgeoning class of social media editors. Sreenivasan watches the newly-minted “listeners-in-chief” closely, maintaining a list of social media editors on Twitter and analyzing how they’re using the social Web to advance the editorial mission of their mastheads.

He showed the ONA audience a tool new to many in the room, TagHive.com, that showed which tags were trending for a group. What’s trending for social media editors? This morning, it was “news, love, work, today, great, people, awesome and thanks.” A good-natured group, at least as evidenced by language.

Sreenivasan also answered a question I posed that is of great personal interest: Is it ethical to friend sources on social networking platforms?

The simple answer is yes, in his opinion, but with many a caveat and tweaks to privacy settings. Sreenivasan described the experiences of people in NGOs, activists and other sources whose work has been impaired by associations on social media. To protect yourself and sources, he recommended that Facebook users untag themselves, practicing “security by obscurity,” and use lists. As an example of what can go wrong, he pointed to WhatTheFacebook.com.

Where should journalists turn next for information? Follow @sreenet on Twitter and browse through the resources in his social media guide, which he referenced in the four videos I’ve embedded in this post. He’s a constant source of relevant news, great writing and good tips.

1 Comment

Filed under blogging, education, journalism, social bookmarking, social media, technology, Twitter, video